GLOSSARY

AA

Anti Aircraft

A&AEE

Aircraft and Armament Experimental Establishment

ACS

Aircraft Carrier Squadron

AEW

Airborne Early Warning

AI

Airborne Interception (Radar)

ASW

Anti Submarine Warfare

BuAer

US Navy Bureau of Aeronautics

CAG

Carrier Air Group

CCA

Carrier Controlled Approach

C of G

Centre of Gravity

CVF

Future Aircraft Carrier

DP

Dual Purpose

ehp

Equivalent Horse Power

eshp

Equivalent Shaft Horse Power

EW

Electronic Warfare

FB

Fighter Bomber

FR

Fighter Reconnaissance

HA

High Angle

HMS

His/Her Majesty’s Ship

HMAS

His/Her Majesty’s Australian Ship

HMCS

His/Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship

HNMS

Her Netherlands Majesty’s Ship

hp

Horse Power

HVAR

High Velocity Aerial Rocket

IAS

Indicated Air Speed

LPH

Landing Platform (Helicopter)

lb st

pounds static thrust (measure of jet engine power)

lb thrust

pounds thrust (same as pounds static thrust)

MAUW

Maximum All Up Weight

MDAP

Mutual Defence Assistance Pact

MTOW

Maximum Take Off Weight

NACA

National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (US organisation)

NAS

Naval Air Squadron or Naval Air Station

NATO

North Atlantic Treaty Organisation

nm

Nautical Mile

OTC

Officer in Tactical Command

PR

Photographic Reconnaissance

RAE

Royal Aircraft Establishment (Farnborough)

RAF

Royal Air Force

RAN

Royal Australian Navy

RATOG

Rocket Assisted Take Off Gear

RCN

Royal Canadian Navy

RN

Royal Navy

RNN

Royal Netherlands Navy

RNVR

Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve

RNZAF

Royal New Zealand Air Force

SAR

Search and Rescue

SBAC

Society of British Aircraft Constructors

STOVL

Short Take Off Vertical Landing

TACAN

Tactical Aid to Navigation

US

United States

USAAF

United States Army Air Force

USAF

United States Air Force (officially formed 1948)

USN

United States Navy

USS

United States Ship

VTOL

Vertical Take Off and Landing

US NAVY AIRCRAFT DESIGNATIONS

During the period under review in this book the US Navy applied a system of designations that indicated the operational role of the aircraft and its manufacturer. The first letter(s) indicated the aircraft’s function and the second letter the manufacturer. Between the two letters was a number that indicated the sequence of designs or projects from that particular manufacturer. Thus, for example, the well known DC-3 civil airliner became the R4D when used by the US Navy as a military transport, indicating that it was the fourth Transport design (R) produced by Douglas (D). Other numbers and letters could be added to indicate sub variants such as the R4D-5T, indicating a Mark 5 (with different engines) adapted for the Training role (T). In the case of the first design of a particular type the number one was omitted, an example being the Douglas Skyraider, which, as the first Douglas Attack aircraft, was designated AD with a subsequent number for sub variants (e.g. AD-4). One major variation that will often be noted in the text is the prefix X for a prototype and Y for a pre-production aircraft, an example being the XF6U-1 Cutlass - prototype of the sixth fighter design by Chance Vought. Relevant manufacturers and function codes are given below, although this list is not exhaustive and many minor functions and manufacturers are omitted for the sake of brevity. This basic system remained in use until 1962 when a common unified designation system was introduced for all US military aircraft (Army, Navy and Air Force).

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